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Well! I never knew that about my baby...

Did you know that.....

1. A baby cannot taste salt until it is 4 months old. The delay may be related to the development of kidneys, which start to process sodium at about that age.[12] O’Hara, Georgina. 1989. The World of the Baby: A Celebration of Infancy through the Ages. New York, NY: Doubleday.

2. In medieval Europe, leeches were commonly used to treat babies’ illnesses. For example, leeches were placed on a baby’s windpipe for croup. Additionally, teething babies were commonly purged or bled.[12] O’Hara, Georgina. 1989. The World of the Baby: A Celebration of Infancy through the Ages. New York, NY: Doubleday.

3. A baby’s eyes are 75% of their adult size, but its vision is around 20/400. By six months, a baby’s vision should reach 20/20.[10] Margulis, Jennifer. 2005. Why Babies Do That: Baffling Baby Behavior Explained. Minocqua, WI: Willow Creek Press.

4. Newborns are more likely to turn their head to the right than to the left.[10] Margulis, Jennifer. 2005. Why Babies Do That: Baffling Baby Behavior Explained. Minocqua, WI: Willow Creek Press.

5. The inner ear is the only sense organ to develop fully before birth. It reaches its adult size by the middle of pregnancy.[5] Fascinating Baby Brains.” Live Science. Accessed: June 14, 2011.

6. A baby's skull doesn't fuse until around age 2. The protein that keeps a baby’s skull from fusing is called “noggin.”[11] Morris, Desmond. 2008. Amazing Baby. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books.

7. Within a few days of birth, a baby can distinguish between the touch of bristles that are of different diameters.[5] Fascinating Baby Brains.” Live Science. Accessed: June 14, 2011.

8. Adults have 206 bones. When babies are born, they have 300. Their bones fuse as they grow, resulting in fewer bones as adults.[11] Morris, Desmond. 2008. Amazing Baby. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books.

9. The intestines of a newborn are about 11 feet long. The length will double by the time the baby grows to adulthood.[11] Morris, Desmond. 2008. Amazing Baby. Buffalo, NY: Firefly Books.

10. A newborn urinates about every 20 minutes and then roughly every hour at 6 months.[12] O’Hara, Georgina. 1989. The World of the Baby: A Celebration of Infancy through the Ages. New York, NY: Doubleday.

© 2020 by Sonia Deighton